Workshops > TRB10

2010 Tutorial School on Fluid Dynamics: Topics in Turbulence

 May 24-28, 2010

CSIC Building (#406), Seminar Room 4122.
Directions: www.cscamm.umd.edu/directions
 

With the support of
The Burgers Program for Fluid Dynamics, University of Maryland
The Institute for Physical Science & Technology, University of Maryland
Center for Environmental and Applied Fluid Mechanics, Johns Hopkins University
The National Science Foundation

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ORGANIZING COMMITTEE

Name Affiliation Email
Charles Meneveau Johns Hopkins University, Department of Mechanical Engineering meneveau@jhu.edu
Rajarshi Roy University of Maryland, IPST rroy@umd.edu
Katepalli R. Sreenivasan International Centre for Theoretical Physics, krs@ictp.trieste.it
Eitan Tadmor University of Maryland, CSCAMM, Mathematics & IPST tadmor@cscamm.umd.edu
James Wallace University of Maryland, Department of Mechanical Engineering wallace@umd.edu

REGISTRATION CLOSED

ABSTRACT

The turbulent motion of liquids and gases is a ubiquitous phenomenon in nature and engineering. Such motion is fundamental to the formation of planets from interstellar clouds of particulates, to the dynamics of the earth’s atmosphere and oceans that determine weather systems, to the mixing of reactants in combustion, to the dispersion of pollutants from smokestacks and storm sewers, and to the health risks caused by diseased arteries, to name but a few examples. Understanding and modeling the physics of turbulent motion is the basis of predicting its effects in these and numerous other examples and controlling it in engineering applications such as the design of air and surface vehicles, efficient engines for propulsion, heat exchangers and stents and heart valves.

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GOALS

This School on Topics in Turbulence is designed primarily for advanced graduate students and post-docs, i.e. participants who have had an introductory course in turbulence and who would find it beneficial to go deeper into the subject.

It will focus on recent developments in the understanding of turbulence, its prediction and control using modern experimental and analytical techniques and powerful numerical simulation capabilities. Tutorials on turbulence theory, experimental and simulation methods, turbulent transport in single and two-phase flows and applications of turbulence will be given by senior lecturers. Ample open discussion time will provide opportunities for participants to have a rich exchange of ideas.

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Tutorial Instructors:

Turbulence Theory
Katepalli Sreenivasan International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste, Italy
Gregory Eyink Department of Applied Mathematics & Statistics, The Johns Hopkins University
Measurement Methods
James Duncan Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Maryland
Kenneth Kiger Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Maryland
Dan Lathrop Department of Physics, Geology and IREAP, University of Maryland
James Wallace Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Maryland
Turbulent Transport in Single & Two-Phase Flows
Peter Bernard Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Maryland
Ken Kiger Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Maryland
Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) Theory and Models
Charles Meneveau Department of Mechanical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University
Elias Balaras Department of Bioengineering, University of Maryland
Applications
Elias Balaras Department of Bioengineering, University of Maryland
Peter Bernard Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Maryland
Marcelo Chamecki Department of Meteorology, Pennsylvania State University
Mohamed Gad-el-Hak Department of Mechanical Engineering, Virginia Commonwealth University
Pino Martin Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Maryland
Charles Meneveau Department of Mechanical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University
Kyle Squires Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Arizona State University

CONFIRMED PARTICIPANTS

Name Affiliation
Saba Almalkie University of Massachusetts, Amherst
Will Anderson Johns Hopkins University
Carla Bahri American University of Beirut
Elias Balaras University of Maryland
Peter S. Bernard University of Maryland
Chen Bin Xi'an JiaoTong University
Hakki E. Cekli Eindhoven University of Technology
Marcelo Chamecki Pennsylvania State University
Qingshan Chen Florida State University
Navid Dianati Maleki University of Michigan
James Duncan University of Maryland
Gregory L. Eyink The Johns Hopkins University
Mohamed Gad-el-Hak Virginia Commonwealth University
Qi Gao University of Minnesota
Varun Hiremath Cornell University
Sander G. Huisman University of Twente
Rozita Jalali Farahani Johns Hopkins University
Matthew D. James University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Hamid reza Khakpour Johns Hopkins University
Kenneth Kiger University of Maryland
Aditya Konduri Georgia Institute of Technology
Valentina Koschatzky Delft University of Technology
Marcel Kwakkel Delft University of Technology
Dan P. Lathrop University of Maryland
Yi Liu Johns Hopkins University
Valerio Lorenzoni TU Delft University
Paul A. Lott National Institute of Standards & Technology
Michael B. Martell The University of Massachusetts Amherst
Pino Martin University of Maryland
Shivaji Medida University of Maryland College Park
Charles Meneveau Johns Hopkins University
Vivek Nagendra Prakash University of Twente
Mohamad Mehdi Nasr Azadani University of Califorania, Santa Barbara
Younes Nouri Johns Hopkins University
Gosse Oldenziel Delft university of technology/FOM
Cecilia Ortiz Duenas University of Minnesota
Arati Pati University of Houston
Rodrigo M. Pereira Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro
Gabriel Plunk University of Maryland
Kaustubh J. Rao University of Massachusetts at Amherst
Rajarshi Roy University of Maryland
Scott T. Salesky Pennsylvania State University
Mohamed A. Samaha Virginia Commonwealth University
Kyle Squires Arizona State University
Katepalli R. Sreenivasan International Centre for Theoretical Physics
Parvez S. Sukheswalla Cornell University
Eitan Tadmor University of Maryland
Nathaniel Trask University of Massachusetts
Daniele Violato TU Delft
Andrew Voegele University of Maryland
James Wallace University of Maryland
Di Yang Johns Hopkins University

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FUNDING

A limited amount of travel and local lodging is available for researchers in the early stages of their career who want to attend the full program, especially for graduate students and post-doctoral fellows.

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INFORMATION FOR PARTICIPANTS

CSCAMM Visitor Guide: www.cscamm.umd.edu/visitors


CONTACT

Center for Scientific Computation And Mathematical Modeling (CSCAMM)
Computer Science Instructional Center (Building #406)
University of Maryland, College Park
College Park, MD 20742-3289

Email: trb10@cscamm.umd.edu

Web: http://www2.cscamm.umd.edu/programs/trb10


POSTER

Poster is available here.


PHOTOS

Photos from workshop are available here.

ACKNOWLEDGMENT

Partial funding is provided by The Burgers Program for Fluid Dynamics at UMd, the Institute for Physical Science & Technology at UMd, the National Science Foundation, and the Center for Environmental and Applied Fluid Mechanics at Johns Hopkins University.

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